Romeo & Juliet

Romeo & Juliet

The most likely source for Romeo & Juliet was Dante‘s “Purgatorio” and Arthur Brooke‘s English translation entitled “Tragicall Historye of Romeus & Juliet” (1562), first registered at the Stationer’s Office in 22nd January 1607 and only featuring in the First Folio of 1623 (F1). This was based on a French translation of a poem by Boiastuau of Bandello’s. Charlton Ogburn suggests the play was probably written when the Earl of Oxford was having an extra-marital affair with Queen Elizabeth’s Lady-in-Waiting, Anne Vavasour around the time when he was obliged to return living with his wife, Anne Cecil (late 1581). In my view this was overlaid onto the warring families of Montecchi and Capelleti who lived in 13th century Italy. The play was first performed in 1595 and published first in a corrupt Quarto (1597) and an authentic one in 1599 before being included in the Folio of 1623. Shakespeare’s play Romeo & Juliet was presented at the Curtain Theatre an amphitheatre situated in Curtain Close, Finsbury Fields, Shoreditch, by the Lord Chamberlain’s Men from October 1587. Romeo & Juliet was first published by Cuthbert Burbage (1599), the same year that the Globe Theatre opened with the other Shakespeare play Julius Caesar. His copyright was bought by Nicholas Ling who passed it on to John Smethwick, Master Warden at the Stationer’s Office who had a shop in Fleet Street. John Danter (?-1599), in company with Henry Chettle, printed two of Shakespeare’s quartos for the distributor Thomas Millington and Edward White (1594) as well as a pirated version of Romeo & Juliet (1597). They were especially poor quality and Danter was reprimanded for illegal printing.

The links to my publications “Shakespeare’s Qaballah”, a Companion to Shakespeare Studies and my anthology of poetry, “Pathenogenesis” are as follows:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/8182537193
https://www.cyberwit.net/publications/1721

Website: www.qudosacademy.org

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